In publication since 1845, Scientific American is one of the oldest and longest running continuously published magazines in the United States. It is a popular science magazine that primarily focuses on articles that offer cutting-edge and innovative scientific research. Scientific American is geared towards an educated, general audience with an interest in issues within the field, as its forum of theories and discoveries are explained in an accessible and approachable fashion. Every issue presents the most riveting and fascinating work being conducted in areas such as medicine, technology, energy, the environment, and business. Scientific American is also well-known for its constant accuracy in anticipating advances and leaps on a broad range of topics within both the physical and social sciences. This monthly magazine dynamically presents the remarkable efforts of world-renowned scientists and Nobel laureates.

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Customer Reviews

    • Rating
    Great for geeks of all kinds!

    Are you a geek? I am. That's probably the only reason Scientific American appealed to me. I have read this magazine since I was about 12 years old in the early 90's. (yea, I'm a young one) The wonderful thing about this magazine is that it doesn't matter what kind of geek you are, this magazine has something for you. I am more of a biology geek and so I enjoy the articles that deal with biology/health.

    In the Nov. 2000 issue of Scientific American a biology geek, like myself, may be interested in reading in an article entitled: "Cloning Noah's Ark". This article discusses how the new cloning technology might offer a way to keep some...

    • Rating

    Excellent magazine. The changes over the years has made this the best science magazine in the US. The articles are great, the illustrations superb, the writing style/editing is excellent, web sites and references are included, and the format appealing. The August 2003 issue illustrates the range of material in SciAm. The main articles include molecular biology (gene regulation), social implications of "have nots" in the digital world, the role of the cerebellum, cosmology, archeology, and anthropology. There were seven short "news scan" articles on equally diverse topics. There are two-page articles on "optical tweezers," diverse strange patents,...

    • Rating
    Balanced science reporting for intelligent readers

    I've been reading Scientific American since I was a tiny child. My dad used to subscribe to it, and even before I could read I loved to pick it up and look at the strange, beautiful pictures. When I learned to read, Scientific American was one of my favorite targets, even though I could not understand many of those big giant words. But dad was glad to explain some of it, and the rest I was told I would understand in time.

    Those years did pass, and I still read each issue with great attention. As an avid fan of science, nature, and technology, I find that Scientific American presents recent developments in a style suited for intelligent, savvy...

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